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Liz Barratt-Brown’s Blog

President says he's putting American public health and safety first and won't cut deal with Republicans on Keystone XL tar sands pipeline

Liz Barratt-Brown

Posted December 7, 2011 in Moving Beyond Oil

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Dec 2011 Canadian Embassy Protest credit Elizabeth Shope.jpg

Today, the President – in a question and answer session with reporters after a meeting with Canadian Prime Minister Harper – made it clear he is not backing down from his decision last month to take another year to understand the full implications of the massive tar sands project.  The pipeline would carry nearly 1 million barrels a day of highly toxic tar sands crude from Alberta to the Gulf of Mexico, where it can be shipped anywhere in the world.  It would bisect the heartland of the country, crossing nearly 2000 rivers and streams and cutting through Nebraska’s sensitive Ogallala aquifer and Sandhills region.  Last month, the President delayed a decision on the pipeline, saying that there were health and safety concerns, especially in Nebraska, that needed to be addressed.  The announcement to take more time also committed to looking more closely at the climate impacts of the pipeline.    

In a question about whether he would consider a deal on Keystone XL to get legislation extending the payroll tax cut, the President made it clear he was putting the health and safety of the American public first and that he would reject any effort to tie fast tracking Keystone XL to the payroll tax legislation.  When asked if his decision to delay the pipeline was a political one, he shot back that the pipeline is a big project with big consequences and that it was his job to make sure that the right process is followed to reach a good decision for the American public health and safety.  This closely tracks what the President said in an interview with a Nebraska news station a month ago. 

Republicans in both chambers of Congress have been threatening to attach bills to the payroll tax cut extension that would force the President to make a decision on the pipeline.  In a hyperbolic statement today, Majority Leader Boehner said that Keystone XL would create tens of thousands of jobsTransCanada itself has admitted that the pipeline would ultimately create only a few hundred of jobs and that it would create 6,000 temporary jobs over two years of construction.  The Cornell Global Labor Institute – in the only independent study done on jobs – found that the pipeline would in fact be a job killer, suppressing clean energy jobs and slowing the economic recovery in the Midwest by raising gas prices (the pipeline would divert oil from the Midwest).  Boehner and others have argued that the pipeline would create greater American energy security but the pipeline would divert oil from the Midwest for years and carry oil to the Gulf where it could be exported anywhere in the world. Oil giant Valero, one of the major shippers on the pipeline, has said it plans to export much of what it refines.

NRDC has been actively working to stop House Republicans from adding so-called riders to the tax extension.  With only days left before adjourning for the year, the House leadership has threatened to load up the bill with numerous anti-environmental provisions, including pushing the pipeline through. 

Of course, there is a certain irony in all of this.  It has in no small part been due to Republican politicians in Nebraska that the pipeline decision has been delayed.  The Republic Governor Dave Heineman and Senator Mike Johanns and many ranchers and farmers in Nebraska have made it clear that they will not accept a pipeline that puts their irrigation and drinking water at risk.  The pipeline would actually be laid into the Ogallala aquifer, source of drinking water for over 2 million Americans and irrigation water for eight states.   

Once again, the extreme anti-environment House is playing politics with the health and safety of the American public.The President asked them to do the people’s business instead. 

The President also made it clear to Prime Minister Harper that he was not speeding up the review.  In previous meetings, Harper has made it clear that he expects the President to approve the pipeline, and his government has spared no effort to lobby for its approval.  Today, Harper took a more conciliatory stance, refusing to comment on internal politics - this likely due both to the President's clear statement on the pipeline and perhaps also due to a decision yesterday that a pipeline in his own country - to the B.C. coast - would also be delayed due to public concerns.  

Those who seek to push these dirty oil pipelines through - whether Republicans in Congress or the Prime Minister of Canada - do so at our expense and at the beckoning of Big Oil. 

Thanks to the President, today concerns for our health and safety came first. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Comments

C ParkerDec 8 2011 01:46 PM

regarding the pipeline...I saw on the news
that Obama and Harper were meeting to discuss the pipeline and in exchange for cross border imports/exports. The jest I got from it is that the pipeline is going to go through one way or another.
I may not be !00% correct, because it was a quick blurb, but I would like to know more regarding that information.
I also have a friend in Canada and he said it will go though as well. The Canadian do not want it or the oil tankers and that is (one) reason why they are pushing it though the States.

Liz Barratt-BrownDec 8 2011 02:55 PM

Prime Minister Harper has always taken the opportunity to push the pipeline and tar sands in press events with the President. Yesterday, he restrained from commenting, signalling that perhaps the President had made it clear in their private meetings that he was not backing down on his decision to do a thorough environmental review. This has bought critical time to further raise questions about the risks and benefits of this pipeline and to educate more Americans about what is at stake. The entire oil industry has been pushing this hard so it is no surpise that many thought the pipeline was a done deal (see my blog on this: http://switchboard.nrdc.org/blogs/lizbb/why_transcanada_and_others_sho.html). But it is not and when the true risks are understood, the chances that it will be rejected grow greater.

Thanks for following our blogs.

katDec 10 2011 08:49 AM

Censorship is alive and well here I see.
The only reason for the delay is there is an election coming up and that is the only reason!

Conusam/mmfy/kat - if you don't see a comment you've left on this post, it may be that it was removed per NRDC's policy, stated below. – Ian @ NRDC

conusamDec 10 2011 08:53 AM

The sign in the picture so hypocritical - American your halo fell off years ago. Get real!
If you think your the saviors of the planet think again.
Clean up your own backyard and don't bother to say that is what your doing because you're not.
Let's not even bother to get into your politics America and your meddle into the affairs all over the world.

Myob

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Switchboard is the staff blog of the Natural Resources Defense Council, the nation’s most effective environmental group. For more about our work, including in-depth policy documents, action alerts and ways you can contribute, visit NRDC.org.

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