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Kristin Eberhard’s Blog

All Angelenos to be Impacted by Changing Climate in Los Angeles Region

Kristin Eberhard

Posted June 22, 2012 in Curbing Pollution, Solving Global Warming

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UCLA’s Los Angeles Regional Collaborative released a study today forecasting significant warming in the Los Angeles region over the next century. The study, entitled “Mid-Century Warming in the Los Angeles Region,” predicts that the number of days with temperatures above 95 degrees each year will triple in downtown Los Angeles, quadruple in the valleys and quintuple in some places like the mountains and deserts in LA County. The study even predicts a warming trend of three to four degrees for the coastal areas like Santa Monica and Long Beach.

Temperature Extremes in LA

To find out more about the study, read the  Los Angeles Times article and check out the new website at C-CHANGE.LA.

This isn't about somebody else, faraway, or in the vague and distant future.  This is about you and me, right here, right now.  LA is getting hotter, and we are going to feel it.  Warming temperatures affect local precipitation, soil moisture, and run-off and impact public health, water supply, and air quality. But now that we know, we can do something about it. Voters have already started us down the path to action by approving Measure R, which will increase tansit options just giving us the possibility of getting out of our car and reducing pollution. LADWP is going to help by helping us make our homes and businesses more energy efficient, and reducing water usage can also help reduce our impact on the changing climate. We need to do all this and more to keep the beautiful weather that we all love. 

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