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Take Local Opposition National By Saying No to Pebble Mine

Joel Reynolds

Posted July 16, 2012 in Saving Wildlife and Wild Places

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In May, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency released a draft scientific assessment of the potential impacts of large-scale mining—like the proposed Pebble Mine—in the Bristol Bay region of southwest Alaska. And the results are sobering: the mine would generate 10 billion tons of toxic waste, destroy at least 50 miles of fish spawning and rearing streams, eliminate thousands of acres of wetlands, and threaten to destroy or degrade the region’s $480 million annual commercial and recreational fishing industry (which provides thousands of jobs) as well as Alaska Native subsistence fishing.

I recently uploaded a petition to stop Pebble Mine to SignOn.org—you can find it here. Online campaign platforms such as SignOn.org empower everyone by offering them opportunities to express their views and ultimately effect change. Help me use these new activism tools to mobilize overwhelming public support for EPA’s scientific findings—findings that unequivocally show the Pebble Mine would be disastrous for the wildlife and the economy of Bristol Bay.

Join NRDC, Alaska Natives, Bristol Bay residents and businesses, and commercial, recreational, and subsistence fishermen, and urge the EPA to invoke its authority under the Clean Water Act to protect the region from the unavoidable adverse impacts of large scale mining -- and the Pebble Mine.

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Comments

Trace BaronJul 16 2012 09:36 PM

Say no to the pebble mine project!!!! Save one of the last and greatest wild salmon runs in the world!!!!!

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Switchboard is the staff blog of the Natural Resources Defense Council, the nation’s most effective environmental group. For more about our work, including in-depth policy documents, action alerts and ways you can contribute, visit NRDC.org.

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