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World Health Organization sounds alarm over antibiotic resistant bacteria while Foster Farms seems to still be spreading them on its chicken

Jonathan Kaplan

Posted April 30, 2014 in Living Sustainably

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Yesterday the World Health Organization issued a landmark 256 page assessment of the antibiotic resistant bacteria that now roam the globe.  The upshot:  “Without urgent, coordinated action by many stakeholders, the world is headed for a post-antibiotic era, in which common infections and minor injuries which have been treatable for decades can once again kill,” says Dr Keiji Fukuda, WHO’s Assistant Director-General for Health Security.

As the report notes, “…these drugs have been extensively misused in both humans and food-producing animals in ways that favor the selection and spread of resistant bacteria.”

We don’t know for sure, but this sort of antibiotic misuse may be an underlying cause of the antibiotic resistance we're seeing in the Salmonella outbreak linked to Foster Farms -- an outbreak that is still afflicting chicken eaters here in the US.   According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), nearly two-thirds of the Salmonella sampled from afflicted patients tested resistant to one or more antibiotics.  CDC’s update on April 9 indicates that the outbreak is still going more than a year after its official start date in March 2013.

Foster Farms admits that it uses antibiotics, but has declined requests by NRDC and other public interest groups to disclose its antibiotic use or to commit to safe antibiotic stewardship practices.

Here’s a recent infographic summarizing the situation (yes, NRDC officially gives you permission to share, link or re-post as you like. Click on it for a larger version).  Get more facts about the Foster Farms outbreak here.

NRDC_Infographic_8.5x11_06[1].jpg

Let’s ask Foster Farms to take a close look at the WHO report that came out yesterday–and its own use of antibiotics.  Please consider tweeting your request to @fosterfarms and @NRDCFood.   We’re thinking #FosterHarms.

 

 

 

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Comments

Ian WelchMay 2 2014 11:17 AM


No matter how the food industry spins it, you can’t get away from the deluge of news regarding the horrendous quality of meat in the U.S. The sources are not bloggers and hippies. The studies are peer-reviewed with massive study groups. Our own government, the last place you go for unbiased opinions, has recently made overt moves towards a diet less reliant on animals. No amount of lobbying can hold back the stream of research confirming the obvious. Meat is a “killing industry” for everyone involved.

The animals being eaten today by Americans are in terrible shape, and represent a very poor quality of nutrition. Organic, free range, lean… blah, blah, blah. Six states have made it a crime to film animal suffering because they absolutely don’t want you to see beyond the pretty cellophane package in your freezer. The meat is inedible. If you saw the cow or chicken you are about to eat, you wouldn’t touch it, much less eat it.

Do you honestly feel that an animal raised in a pen/crate, with no exercise, no sunlight, surrounded by feces, eating byproduct feed, injected with growth hormones, antidepressants and massive amounts of antibiotics, then slaughtered, sprayed with chlorine, full of death stress hormones is a good food decision?

Not eating meat is not a casual decision anymore; it’s a matter of life or death

Rest of comment: http://wholefed.org/2013/05/01/six-reasons-to-give-up-meat-adopt-a-plant-based-diet/

Ian Welch

Sarah ShapiroMay 2 2014 03:25 PM

Well there is the choice of eating pasture raised animals or raising your own for consumption.

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Switchboard is the staff blog of the Natural Resources Defense Council, the nation’s most effective environmental group. For more about our work, including in-depth policy documents, action alerts and ways you can contribute, visit NRDC.org.

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